Showing posts tagged prison.
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R E A L / L O V E

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ourcatastrophe:

lilacbootlaces:

jane-potter:

“Sylvia Rivera kicking ass on stage after some radfems & transphobes tried to refuse her the right to speak at the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day rally. Said radfems then had their own march in part protesting trans participation in Pride. A precursor to today’s Dyke March.”

Source: thespiritwas

It is women like Sylvia Rivera and Marsha P. Johnson who started the Stonewall riots and queer liberation. 43 years later, trans women of color, the people who started the movement, are the people maligned and left behind by it.

In Sylvia’s words, “What the FUCK is wrong with you all?”

[[Trigger warning: suicide]]

Sylvia went home that night and attempted suicide. 

Marsha Johnson came home and found her in time to save her life.

Sylvia left the movement after that day and didn’t come back for twenty years.

this is incredible, she is incredible, I highly recommend watching it

but I think the addendum re: the effect of this day on sylvia is really important

so often we valorise decontextualised moments of tough, articulate resistance and rage

and the suffering of the people who embodied them is not acknowledged, it’s uncomfortable, it’s not inspiring, we want them to stay tough and cool and stylish forever

which is particularly terrible when I think about how sylvia felt like that because of women like me — women who are now watching this video and feeling inspired and impressed and maybe a bit pleased with ourselves for finally having watched a speech by the famous and really cool to name-drop sylvia rivera.

(via browcatastrophe-deactivated2013)

— 1 year ago with 8179 notes
#Sylvia Rivera  #transmysogyny  #trans  #women  #suidice  #violence  #prison  #rape  #sexual violence  #context 
Trans women on second week of prison hunger strike →

Two trans women in a San Diego prison entered their second week of hunger strike over the weekend.

Amazon and Catarina, both trans women imprisoned at that Richard J. Donovan Correctional facility, have refused food since Sept. 21 in a strike “against the unfair treatment of trans women within [the prison],” according to a release from radical trans women’s collective Gender Anarky (of which both inmates are members).

Since both Amazon and Catarina are trans women in a men’s prison, the inmates have been held in isolated, single cells — despite having asked to share a cell with each other. It is not clear what convictions the two inmates are serving time for — Gender Anarky does not list its members’ crimes; to do so would be to use the logic of the prison system, which they fight against.

Transgender individuals are regularly put on single-cell status, or even moved into solitary confinement in the U.S. prison system.

This particular hunger strike is underpinned by a militant anti-prison stance. The release from the inmates’ collective calls for “directly attacking the systems of domination that make living conditions of trans women, both inside and outside prison, a living hell.”

Amazon and Catarina’s situation is not the first in recent months to bring attention to the treatment of trans individuals in the criminal justice system. Notably, CeCe McDonald, a trans woman in Minnesota, was sentenced to 41 months in prison after killing one of her attackers when she was assaulted by a group, one of whom smashed a glass in her face. At the time, Mother Jones noted that trans women accounted for 50 percent of LGBTQ hate-crime murder victims in 2009.

McDonald is being held at a male prison in Minnesota, where she can shower alone and has a single cell. According to a May report from MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry, Minnesota is currently incarcerating 10 trans inmates in a similar manner.

(Natasha Lennard, Salon)

(Source: transfeminism, via ryrysparkleby)

— 1 year ago with 553 notes
#trans  #women  #prison  #prison industrial complex 
forestfungus:

This poster series is simply awesome. Check it out www.crossbordersydney.org



“We don’t cross borders; borders cross us” is a 12 poster series organised by the Cross Border Collective. The objective of the posters is to invite an engaged audience to consider a series of propositions about the Australian border, labour, race and incarceration. The poster series aims to show that the Australian border is not a natural or inevitable thing. They explore the fact that the border is artificial, confront common assumptions about border-crossers, and consider how the border manages peoples’ movements to benefit industry and the state.


The process of collaboration in the production of the posters and the stories about their intention has been an important part of the project. The posters are a result of collaboration between the Cross Border Collective, individuals and groups active through art, politics and advocacy in resistance to the effects of the border on people’s lives. This includes individuals directly affected by border politics through their experiences of detention, their experiences as refugees, migrants and temporary workers, as well as those affected by border politics despite their Australian citizenship. Groups involved in collaboration include: Treaty Republic, the Indigenous Social Justice Association, Refugee Action Coalition, The Refugee Art Project, Scarlet Alliance Australian Sex Workers Association Migration Project, and prison and labour activist groups. The broad range of groups and individuals involved in the project reflects the many ways that the border shapes people’s lives. The process of initiating collaboration with campaigns and groups that don’t primarily see themselves as immersed in border politics was part of our broader intent to encourage conversations about the intersecting ways that the border shapes different arenas of social life. It is also about trying to find a political axis along which our commonality may form the basis for collective action.

forestfungus:

This poster series is simply awesome. Check it out www.crossbordersydney.org

“We don’t cross borders; borders cross us” is a 12 poster series organised by the Cross Border Collective. The objective of the posters is to invite an engaged audience to consider a series of propositions about the Australian border, labour, race and incarceration. The poster series aims to show that the Australian border is not a natural or inevitable thing. They explore the fact that the border is artificial, confront common assumptions about border-crossers, and consider how the border manages peoples’ movements to benefit industry and the state.

The process of collaboration in the production of the posters and the stories about their intention has been an important part of the project. The posters are a result of collaboration between the Cross Border Collective, individuals and groups active through art, politics and advocacy in resistance to the effects of the border on people’s lives. This includes individuals directly affected by border politics through their experiences of detention, their experiences as refugees, migrants and temporary workers, as well as those affected by border politics despite their Australian citizenship. Groups involved in collaboration include: Treaty Republic, the Indigenous Social Justice Association, Refugee Action Coalition, The Refugee Art Project, Scarlet Alliance Australian Sex Workers Association Migration Project, and prison and labour activist groups. The broad range of groups and individuals involved in the project reflects the many ways that the border shapes people’s lives. The process of initiating collaboration with campaigns and groups that don’t primarily see themselves as immersed in border politics was part of our broader intent to encourage conversations about the intersecting ways that the border shapes different arenas of social life. It is also about trying to find a political axis along which our commonality may form the basis for collective action.

(via browcatastrophe-deactivated2013)

— 2 years ago with 15 notes
#cross border collective  #prison  #labour  #australia  #poster  #borders  #art 
"

CeCe McDonald, the young black transgender woman who accepted a plea deal and pled guilty to second-degree manslaughter last month will be incarcerated by the state of Minnesota as a male. McDonald was arrested after she stabbed a white male who was part of a group of that physically and verbally attacked her with transgender and racial slurs.

The plea agreement calls for a sentence of three years and five months in prison, according to the Star Tribune.

Upon sentencing, McDonald, 24, will be taken into custody by the state Department of Corrections and housed as a male “because he is being housed as a male with Hennepin County,” corrections spokeswoman Sarah Russell told the Star Tribune on Monday. “We will intake him as a male at St. Cloud prison.”

Russell went on to add the state will make its own determination of McDonald’s gender.

“We will assess him as any other offender would be assessed,” Russell said. “The assessments include, but are not limited to, screening for potential vulnerability to sexual assaults, tendencies to act out with sexually aggressive behavior and any disabilities” as defined by federal law.

The Transgender Law Center gathered testimonies from former prisoners, sheriffs, and others, about the risks that many prisoners face and found that sexual violence is an “ever present fact of life for far too many transgender prisoners.”

"

—Colorlines’ Jorge Rivas reports on the added injury the state Minnesota inflicts on CeCe McDonald.  (via racialicious)

I still would like to strangle folks over this entire situation.

(via tranqualizer)

(via tranqualizer)

— 2 years ago with 379 notes
#Cece Mcdonald  #cece  #colorlines  #prison  #racism  #transphobia  #state violence  #USA  #Minnesota  #law 
Newman Government axes funding to Sisters Inside female prisoner counselling service →

leonineantiheroine:

THE Queensland Government has axed funding for a service offering support to some of the state’s most disadvantaged women.

Sisters Inside had relied on $120,000-a-year in state funding to provide counselling and support services to women prisoners at the Townsville Correctional Centre, many of them indigenous.

The outreach service was set up 18 months ago after a woman committed suicide within the prison.

But the contract will not be renewed when it expires next month, as the Newman Government continues attempts to cut costs and bring the state’s Budget back into the black.

Sisters Inside chief executive officer Debbie Kilroy said she was shocked when new Communities director-general Margaret Allison delivered the news during a meeting today.

“Post-relief services and services throughout the prison system are really important to engage with the women so they don’t commit other offences and come back to prison,” Ms Kilroy said.

“And it’s only $120,000 a year, when we save hundreds of thousands of dollars for the Government by women not committing further crimes and coming back to prison or their children are returned so then Child Safety aren’t involved, court services aren’t involved.”

Ms Kilroy said she had no choice but to wind up the popular outreach service, which had already helped 188 women in the first quarter of this year.

“The trauma in that prison 80 per cent are Aboriginal women, over 90 per cent can’t read or write, they are totally isolated, they are victims of very serious physical and sexual violence from a very young age that hasn’t been addressed,” she said.

“A lot are in there because they have defended themselves in a violent relationship and in that context committed an offence themselves or they’re there for summary offences, minor stuff, that’s accumulated because of the alcoholism.”

Comment has been sought from Communities Minister Tracy Davis.


argggh!

(via leonineantiheroine-deactivated2)

— 2 years ago with 13 notes
#sisters inside  #prison industrial complex  #prison  #racism  #QLD  #Australia  #Indigenous  #townsville correctional centre 
New Northern Territory Intervention Changes

moniquemallo:

  • Retains current alcohol bans, but increases penalties to six months imprisonment for liquor offences under 1350 milliliters, or an 18 month maximum prison sentence for liquor offences greater than 1350 millilitres. 
  • The Indigenous affairs minister will be able to request that Northern Territory licensing assessors assess premises that sell, or allow for the consumption of alcohol, where there is concern that they are contributing to alcohol-related harm to Aboriginal people.
  • Retains porn bans in prescribed areas.

One of the biggest concerns raised by submissions to the inquiry included the harsh penalties on alcohol possession in prescribed areas. The North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency (NAAJA)’s Johnathon Hunyor told the inquiry there was little evidence to suggest that increased penalties worked.

“I think that one of the issues we need to look at every time an increase in penalty and an increase in imprisonment is imposed is: what is the opportunity cost if realistically that is going to mean sending more people to jail?
Jail costs more than $100 000 per person per year, according to the Productivity Commission. Surely there are better ways to be spending that money on the sorts of things…touched on today that are lacking in our communities - that is rehabilitation, culturally appropriate services and culturally relevant treatment. That is where we should be putting the energy and resources, not on increasing the potential for people to go to jail.”

Source: “Stolen Futures: And You Thought There Was Nothing Left To Flog” Tracker Magazine Vol 2. Issue 12, APRIL 2012 p. 14

— 2 years ago with 15 notes
#nt intervention  #North Aboriginal Justice Agency  #indigenous  #racism  #australia  #prison 
strugglingtobeheard:

baddominicana:

kemetically-ankhtified:

Bronx Youth of Color Most Vulnerable to School Arrests and Summonses

“Out of a whopping 532 summonses issued to New York City students to appear in court during the last three months of 2011, the Bronx alone accounted for nearly half of all cases. 63% of those summonses were for charges of “disorderly conduct.” 
Unbelievably, 93.5% of the nearly 300 students arrested in the same time period were either Black or Latino - and here too, the Bronx topped the list as the borough with the highest percentage of school-based arrests.”

they abducting the children from my community
!!!

again i reiterate, studies show children of color are NO MORE LIKELY to act up than whites. we are being targeted.

unbelievably? no. the system is working exactly the way it was set up to. killing poc.

strugglingtobeheard:

baddominicana:

kemetically-ankhtified:

Bronx Youth of Color Most Vulnerable to School Arrests and Summonses

“Out of a whopping 532 summonses issued to New York City students to appear in court during the last three months of 2011, the Bronx alone accounted for nearly half of all cases. 63% of those summonses were for charges of “disorderly conduct.”

Unbelievably, 93.5% of the nearly 300 students arrested in the same time period were either Black or Latino - and here too, the Bronx topped the list as the borough with the highest percentage of school-based arrests.”

they abducting the children from my community

!!!

again i reiterate, studies show children of color are NO MORE LIKELY to act up than whites. we are being targeted.

unbelievably? no. the system is working exactly the way it was set up to. killing poc.

(Source: revolutionary-afrolatino)

— 2 years ago with 378 notes
#racism  #school to prison pipeline  #bronx  #youth  #poc  #people of colour  #school  #prison  #prison industrial complex 
squaresome:

This beautiful A2 poster was put out by the Centre for the Human Rights of Imprisoned People (CHRIP) Working Group. It is aimed predominantly at linking community organisations to the movement for decarceration and the abolition of prisons. If you want to get a hold of one of these pretty posters, especially if you work in a community organisation, then get in contact with me, ourcatastophe or str-crssd. They are also available for sale ($4) at the New International Bookshop at Trades Hall in Melbourne. Also a printable version should be on the CHRIP website soon…
CHRIP is a project of Flat Out.

squaresome:

This beautiful A2 poster was put out by the Centre for the Human Rights of Imprisoned People (CHRIP) Working Group. It is aimed predominantly at linking community organisations to the movement for decarceration and the abolition of prisons. If you want to get a hold of one of these pretty posters, especially if you work in a community organisation, then get in contact with me, ourcatastophe or str-crssd. They are also available for sale ($4) at the New International Bookshop at Trades Hall in Melbourne. Also a printable version should be on the CHRIP website soon…

CHRIP is a project of Flat Out.

(via squaresome-deactivated20120630)

— 2 years ago with 38 notes
#CHRIP  #an end to prisons  #australia  #decarceration  #prison  #prison abolition  #prison industrial complex  #violence against women 
Report reveals major health problems in prisons →

ourcatastrophe:

leonineantiheroine:

“CHARANDEV SINGH: It’s nightmarish to be frank. It’s nightmarish.
It’s a place full of fear, it’s a place full of distress, you know. Self-harm issues and suicide issues are extraordinary.
The concentration of people with severe mental illness in high security units and supermaxes and management cells is a stain on this country.

SIMON LAUDER: […] And the treatment on offer is grossly inadequate.
The ombudsman found prisoners suffer significantly higher than average levels of hepatitis, depression, sexually transmitted diseases, self-harm and injury, suicide attempts and hospitalisation.
CHARANDEV SINGH: It’s a critical and long-awaited report. It finally shines a light on what imprisoned people and their families and their advocates have been saying for decades now.

BRETT COLLINS: Well look, the hep C issue is just amazing. The hep C issue is actually one where we - 60 per cent - 60 per cent of women in fact are infected with hepatitis C.
I’m afraid prisoners’ health has been very much neglected. There’s a sense almost of, you know, sit in there, just accept what happens to you and to be lucky if you get out.

CHARANDEV SINGH: I think because they lose their position in their - in the prison they’re in, in terms of employment, in terms of cells, in terms of visits.
It’s a very austere and hectic and maximum security prison setting and to make access to basic healthcare, you know, subject to those kind of conditions and those kinds of regimes is totally unacceptable.
It’d be unacceptable in the community to - to be subject to those kinds of barriers and it’s unacceptable in prison.

CHARANDEV SINGH: Prisoners are proscribed from receiving Medicare services, so all the services are paid for and provided by the state.
Questions of cost and profit, you know, attached to every single treatment decision.
SIMON LAUDER: Brett Collins from Justice Action says cultural change is needed.
Prisons need to be more accountable to the community.”

reblogging to read in full later

charandev singh is really great incidentally

(via browcatastrophe-deactivated2013)

— 2 years ago with 8 notes
#accountability  #cost  #health  #health treatment  #injustice  #justice action  #prison  #prison abolitionism  #prisons  #state  #australia  #australian politics